Faculty

Disclaimer: Consistent with the IHI’s policy, faculty for this program are expected to disclose at the beginning of their presentation(s) any econ​omic or other personal interests that create, or may be perceived as creating, a conflict related to the material discussed. The intent of this disclosure is not to prevent a speaker with a significant financial or other relationship from making a presentation, but rather to provide listeners with information on which they can make their own judgments.

Unless otherwise noted below, each presenter provided full disclosure information, does not intend to discuss an unapproved/investigative use of a commercial product/device, and has no significant financial relationship(s) to disclose. If unapproved uses of products are discussed, presenters are expected to disclose this to participants.​



Jonathan Ripp.jpeg Jonathan Ripp, MD, MPH, is Professor of Medicine, Medical Education and Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Dean for Well-Being and Resilience and Chief Wellness Officer at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS). He received both his undergraduate and medical degrees from Yale University and completed internship and residency in Internal Medicine at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. In the role of Chief Wellness Officer, Dr. Ripp oversees efforts to assess and provide direction for system- and individual-level interventions designed to improve well-being for all students, residents, fellows, faculty, and other health professionals in the Mount Sinai Health System. He is the former Associate Dean of GME for Trainee Well-Being within the ISMMS Office of Graduate Medical Education, in which capacity he served to help spread well-being initiatives across the training programs of the Mount Sinai Health System. In the Department of Medicine, Dr. Ripp practices as a clinician in the Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors home-based primary care program, where he maintains an active patient panel. In addition, Dr. Ripp is the Co-founder and Co-Director of CHARM, the Collaborative for Healing and Renewal in Medicine, an international group of medical educators, academic medical center and well-being leaders, experts in burnout research and interventions, and learners all working to promote healthcare professional and learner well-being. CHARM maintains several leadership networks, including the CHARM Chief Wellness Officer Network and the CHARM GME Well-Being Leaders Network, and also actively develops important content to advance the literature and field of clinician well-being. Recognized for his leadership in this area, Dr. Ripp has been invited to participate in the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education Symposia on Physician Well-Being, join the American College of Physician's Promoting Physician Wellness Task Force, and participate in the National Academy of Medicine’s Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-being and Resilience. He also chairs the Greater New York Hospital Association’s Clinician Well-Being Advisory Group. Dr. Ripp’s primary research interest is in physician burnout and well-being, for which he has received grant support and has published and lectured widely. His multicenter studies have served to better elucidate the causes and consequences of physician burnout and have explored interventions designed to promote clinician well-being.

 

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Cynda Hylton Rushton, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the Anne and George L. Bunting Professor of Clinical Ethics at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and the School of Nursing, and co-chairs the Johns Hopkins Hospital’s Ethics Committee and Consultation Service. In 2016, she co-led a national collaborative, “State of the Science Initiative: Transforming Moral Distress into Moral Resilience in Nursing,” and co-chaired the American Nurses Association professional issues panel that created A Call to Action: Exploring Moral Resilience Toward a Culture of Ethical Practice. She was a member of the National Academies of Medicine, Science and Engineering Committee that produced the report Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-being. She is a member of the American Nurses Association Center for Ethics & Human Rights Ethics Advisory Board and American Nurses Foundation Well-Being Initiative Advisory Board. She is the editor and author of Moral Resilience: Transforming Moral Suffering in Healthcare. Dr. Rushton is a Hastings Center Fellow and Chair of the Hastings Center Fellows Council and a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.