42 items found
12
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Reducing Cardiac Arrests in the Acute Admissions Unit: A Quality Improvement Journey
Current average rating is 2 stars.
A quality improvement project in the acute admissions unit at the Stirling Royal Infirmary in Scotland achieved a 71 percent reduction in the number of cardiac arrests per 1,000 admissions; a 68 percent increase in referrals to palliative care per 1,000 admissions per month; and a 24 percent relative reduction in the 30-day mortality of patients admitted to unit. These results were achieved through the application of improvement methodology to test new innovations and promotion of a safety culture, among other changes.
Early Warning Systems: The Next Level of Rapid Response
Current average rating is 5 stars.
An early warning system can add another layer of early detection to the Rapid Response Team system, helping staff recognize high-risk patients before their condition deteriorates.
Rapid response teams—walk, don’t run
Current average rating is 0 stars.
This article discusses the efficacy and effectiveness of Rapid Response Teams.
Teams quicken response in medical emergencies
Current average rating is 0 stars.
This article describes the implementation of a Medical Emergency Team (also known as a Rapid Response Team) at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) in Pennsylvania.
Empowering Families in Emergencies
Current average rating is 0 stars.
This article describes how some hospitals are allowing families to call on a Rapid Response Team to assess their loved one’s condition.
Recognising clinical instability in hospital patients before cardiac arrest or unplanned admission to intensive care. A pilot study in a tertiary-care hospital
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Over a 12-month period relatively few patients suffered a critical event, but those who did frequently manifested abnormalities in simple physical observations and laboratory tests prior to the critical event.
Improving the utilization of medical crisis teams (Condition C) at an urban tertiary care hospital
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Over a three-year period, interventions that involved objective definition and dissemination of criteria for initiating the Condition C response were significantly associated with increased utilization.
The relationship between early emergency team calls and serious adverse events
Current average rating is 0 stars.
This cluster randomized controlled trial of medical emergency team implementation (the MERIT study) examines the relationship between early emergency team calls and the incidence of serious adverse events — cardiac arrests, deaths, and unplanned admissions to an intensive care unit.
Developing and evaluating a trigger response system
Current average rating is 0 stars.
A streamlined, organized, real-time trigger response system was developed that enabled quality measures targets to be achieved, including decreased response time.
Prospective controlled trial of effect of medical emergency team on postoperative morbidity and mortality rates
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Prospective, controlled before-after trial. In the control period, there were 301 adverse outcomes/1,000 surgical admissions, which decreased to 127/1,000 surgical admissions during the intervention period.
Rates of in-hospital arrests, deaths and intensive care admission: The effect of a medical emergency team
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Three hospitals were included, one with a medical emergency team (MET) which could be called for abnormal physiological parameters or staff concern, while the other two had conventional cardiac arrest teams.
Effects of a medical emergency team on reduction of incidence of and mortality from unexpected cardiac arrests in hospital: Preliminary study
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Clinical intervention by a medical emergency team prompted by clinical instability in a patient significantly reduced the incidence of unexpected cardiac arrest.
Recognition of patients who require emergency assistance: A descriptive study
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Primary findings showed that nurses relied on the following four characteristics to apply the medical emergency team criterion, “seriously worried about a patient”: feeling “not right,” color, agitation, observations marginally changed or not changed at all.
The medical emergency team: Does it really make a difference?
Current average rating is 0 stars.
The article lists benefits of a medical emergency team and discusses how it empowers nursing staff and junior medical staff to call for immediate assistance.
Nurses’ responses to acute severe illness
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Identified a need to educate health professionals regarding the warning signs of acute severe illness and when to summon assistance.
Use of medical emergency team responses to reduce hospital cardiopulmonary arrests
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Increased use of medical emergency team may be associated with fewer cardiopulmonary arrests.
In response to “Effect of introducing the Modified Early Warning score on clinical outcomes, cardiopulmonary arrests and intensive care utilization in acute medical admissions,” Subbe et al. Anaesthesia 2003;58(8):797-802
Current average rating is 5 stars.
Response to an article which described a study that tested the response to introducing an Early Warning Score for patients.
The identification of risk factors for cardiac arrest and formulation of activation criteria to alert a medical emergency team
Current average rating is 0 stars.
This article describes a study that aimed to: (1) identify risk factors for in-hospital cardiac arrest; (2) formulate activation criteria to alert a clinical response culminating in attendance by a Medical Emergency Team (MET); and (3) evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the scoring system.
A comparison of antecedents to cardiac arrests, deaths and emergency intensive care admissions in Australia and New Zealand, and the United Kingdom – the ACADEMIA study
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Data obtained from 90 hospitals over a three-day period confirmed that antecedents are common before death, cardiac arrest and unanticipated ICU admission (the most common were hypotension and a fall in Glasgow Coma Scale).
Evaluation of a medical emergency team one year after implementation
Current average rating is 0 stars.
After an evaluation of a medical emergency team on year after implementation, results show multiple physiological abnormalities are associated with increased mortality.
Introducing critical care outreach: A ward-randomised trial of phased introduction in a general hospital
Current average rating is 0 stars.
This study investigates the effect of a “Critical Care Outreach Team” (analogous to a Medical Emergency Team) on in-hospital mortality and length of stay in an 800-bed general hospital in the north of England.
The evolutionary process of Medical Emergency Team (MET) implementation: Reduction in unanticipated ICU transfers
Current average rating is 0 stars.
The study could not demonstrate whether the observed slight improvement in hospital survival rate over the three years of the study was due to the MET system.
Prospective controlled trial of effect of medical emergency team on postoperative morbidity and mortality rates
Current average rating is 0 stars.
The introduction of an intensive care unit-based medical emergency team in a teaching hospital was associated with a reduced incidence of postoperative adverse outcomes, postoperative mortality rate, and mean duration of hospital stay.
Best-practice protocols: Implementing a rapid response system of care
Current average rating is 0 stars.
Rapid Response Teams provide a method for sending experts to the bedside to assist with patient evaluation and treatment before clinical deterioration progresses to cardiac arrest.
The identification of risk factors for cardiac arrest and formulation of activation criteria to alert a medical emergency team
Current average rating is 0 stars.
This article describes a study that aimed to: (1) identify risk factors for in-hospital cardiac arrest; (2) formulate activation criteria to alert a clinical response culminating in attendance by a Medical Emergency Team (MET); and (3) evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the scoring system.
  
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