Changes to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections

Organizations must test and implement changes to existing processes in order to prevent healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Experts have identified the primary and secondary drivers that have been used to successfully reduce and prevent HAIs; one might view these primary drivers as categories and the secondary drivers as key processes that must occur reliably.
 
 
These recommended changes were developed as part of the IHI Learning and Innovation Community on Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infections (2006-2008). All of these changes are evidence-based. They have been reported in the scientific literature or have been tested and proven successful in practice.
 

 
Changes related to reducing healthcare-associated infections have been developed in various IHI programs and initiatives and similarities may exist among the different suggested improvement ideas.
 
This How-to Guide was developed as part of the IHI Improvement Map initiative. The Guide recommends implementing four components of care to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections.
 
This How-to Guide was developed as part of IHI's 5 Million Lives Campaign. The Guide recommends implementing the five components of care called the IHI Central Line Bundle to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections.
 
 
This How-to Guide was developed as part of IHI's 5 Million Lives Campaign. The Guide recommends implementing four components of care to prevent surgical site infection.
 
 
This How-to Guide was developed as part of IHI's 5 Million Lives Campaign. The Guide recommends implementing the four components of care called the IHI Ventilator Bundle to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia.
 
 
This How-to Guide was developed as part of IHI's 5 Million Lives Campaign. The Guide recommends reliably implementing five components of care to significantly reduce MRSA transmission and infection.
 
 
The purpose of this How-to Guide is to help organizations reduce healthcare-associated infections, including infections due to antibiotic-resistant organisms, by improving hand hygiene practices and use of gloves among health care workers.
 
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