Maternal and Child Health Track

​Maternal and Child Health​ initiatives at IHI aim to improve care across the continuum to promote the health a​nd well-being of all women, infants, children, and families. Specific ​topics within this track include:

  • ​Strategies to reduce prematurity, maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, especially those that aim to reduce racial disparities in outcomes
  • Innovative models to support pregnant and postpartum women with addiction disorders, maternal depression, and behavioral health needs
  • Pediatric chronic disease management, including asthma, diabetes, and obesity
  • Programs and partnerships to support new parents and families, such as home visiting
  • Care models and programs that address a life-course perspective and social determinants of health​​
Session selection is open. View all Maternal and Child Health​ sessions below or see the full program here. ​You can also view this year's 10 Forum tracks.

Maternal & Child Health Sessions

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Learning from Global Bright Spots in Child Well-Being

Learning from Global Bright Spots in Child Well-Being

What do Jonkoping County in Sweden, Tulakes Elementary School in Oklahoma, St. Ninian’s School in Scotland and Afrika Tikkun in South Africa have in common? They are all bright spots that have achieved breakthrough outcomes in maternal and child health and well-being. Using a flipped classroom model, attendees will learn from these and other innovative bright spots, identify the principles that guide the success of each, and how these principles might apply in their own contexts.

After this presentation, you will be able to:

  • Understand the concept of bright spots (positive deviants) and how to use them in improvement practice
  • Study national and global bright spots in maternal and child health
  • Identify key principles that might apply to their own context

Presenters: Soma Stout, MD MS, Executive Lead, 100 Million Healthier Lives, IHI; Marianne McPherson, PhD, MS, Director, 100 Million Healthier Lives Implementation, IHI; Jesper Ekberg, Public Health Manager, The County Council of Jönköping; Mark Redding, Pediatrician, Community Health Access Project

A Learning System to Improve Community Child Health

A Learning System to Improve Community Child Health

Trying to improve outcomes for children in poverty is overwhelming work. This session will describe a learning system approach for getting child health results at scale and demonstrate its application to one community. Strategies to produce a learning system, including design, measurement system, building collective will, co-production, and quality improvement capability will be shared. Using a case study approach, presentations will be made by parents, educators, and providers.

After this presentation, you will be able to:

  • Describe methods to define the needs and aspirations for vulnerable populations in your community
  • Understand how to set the Learning Healthcare System platform to co-produce health through partnerships with families and community organizations
  • Explain approaches to achieve community-wide health using a learning system model to prototype and solve complex and intractable issues

Presenters: Children’s Hospital Medical Center; Robert Kahn, MD, MPH, Associate Chair, Community Health, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Dawn Denno, Senior Director, Community Health, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Developing Culturally Responsive Family Planning

Developing Culturally Responsive Family Planning

Culturally responsive family planning services can help improve equity in birth outcomes and the experience of care for African-American women, who have historically lacked services that adequately address their needs. This session will share findings from a year-long project to better understand African-American women’s attitudes toward pregnancy, family planning, and their interactions with the health care system. Interventions to support shared decision making and culturally responsive family planning services will be highlighted.

After this presentation, you will be able to:

  • Describe challenges to understanding pregnancy intention and barriers in decision making around family planning among African-American women
  • Learn about interventions and tools that can be used to improve shared decision making and the cultural responsiveness of family planning services
  • Understand how innovative models of care, such as WIN (Women-Inspired Neighborhood) Network’s Community Health Worker model, can effectively support and link women to health and health care services

Presenters: Deborah Bamel, MPH, Senior Project Manager, IHI; Lucy Pickard, MBBS, MPH, Pediatric Fellow, London Northwest Healthcare National Health Service Trust; Kimberlydawn Wisdom, MD, MS, Senior Vice President, Community Health and Equity, Chief Wellness and Diversity Officer, Henry Ford Health System; Jaye Clement, MPH, MPP, Director of Community Health Programs and Strategies, Henry Ford Health System

Storyboard Walkaround: State Networks Improve Perinatal Health at Scale

Storyboard Walkaround: State Networks Improve Perinatal Health at Scale

The National Network of Perinatal Quality Collaboratives (PQCs) supports state-based networks of patients, parents, multidisciplinary teams, and other stakeholders to measurably improve maternal and infant health outcomes by sharing best-practice tools and connecting state leaders. This session will highlight lessons for success from a PQC family advisor; the Medicaid medical director and collaborative science lead from a PQC that has significantly improved perinatal outcomes; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) medical officer for the National Network of PQCs.

After this presentation, you will be able to:

  • Access strategies to effectively partner with families for perinatal quality efforts
  • Identify what matters to state leaders and policy makers about improving perinatal care
  • Discover resources and strategies that can support successful perinatal quality improvement initiatives

Presenters: Carole Lannon, MD, MPH, Senior Faculty Lead, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Latoshia Rouse, BS, Family Advisor; Mary Applegate, Medical Director, Ohio Department of Medicaid; Zsakeba Henderson, MD, Medical Officer, Maternal and Infant Health Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Telemedicine Improvements to Obstetrical Care

Telemedicine Improvements to Obstetrical Care

Arkansans struggle with rurality, poverty, health disparities, poor health care access, and worse-than-average infant mortality. Since 2003, Arkansas’s Medicaid agency and only academic medical center have collaborated to deliver ANGELS, Antenatal & Neonatal Guidelines Education and Learning System, a high-risk obstetrical telemedicine program that connects urban specialists with rural providers and patients for clinical consultation and education. The program has contributed to perinatal regionalization and reduced neonatal mortality in Arkansas. ANGELS’ leaders will offer insight on how to implement similar efforts in other states.

After this presentation, you will be able to:

  • Recognize obstetrical health inequalities in rural populations
  • Identify clinical and educational approaches in obstetrical telemedicine that may be replicated in other jurisdictions
  • Understand how combinations of telemedical, telephonic, mobile health, and tele-educational approaches complement each other in serving hard-to-reach patients and providers

Presenters: Curtis Lowery, MD, Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; Sarah Rhoads, PhD, DNP, WHNP-BC, Director of Education, Center for Distance Health and ANGELS, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; Rosalyn Perkins, APRN, Director of Operations, College of Medicine, Center for Distance Health Telemedicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; Tina Benton, BSN, RN, ANGELS Program Director, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Person and Place Base Design to Reduce Preterm Births

Person and Place Base Design to Reduce Preterm Births

Our goal is to achieve reduction in preterm birth rates for a population (zip code–based) of low income pregnant women. In this session, prenatal care transformation strategies will be discussed, including design thinking, population-based measurement systems, team-based care with integration of obstetrics and home care providers, legal aid to mitigate social risks and community engagement by health care. These have led to a reduction in extreme preterm birth and infant mortality stretching over two years.

After this presentation, you will be able to:

  • Understand use of design thinking to help drive person and place–based care transformation
  • Create a measurement strategy of population-based outcomes and process measures to promote care for every woman
  • Design core attributes of a multi-stakeholder care system that prioritizes women’s needs

Presenters: Robert Kahn, MD, MPH, Associate Chair, Community Health, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Michael Marcotte, MD, Director of Quality and Safety for Women’s Services, TriHealth Corporation