Current Work



Organizations participating in the Improving Patient Care (IPC) program will show improvement in preventive care, management of chronic conditions and experience of care, while maintaining financial viability, within an 18-month period. These improvements will be spread across the Indian Health System in an ongoing journey of transformation.

 

Aims of the Program 

The aim of the Improving Patient Care (IPC) program for the Indian Health system is to improve health and promote wellness for American Indians and Alaska Natives across all ages. The redesigned system of care will be grounded in the values and culture of the community served. It will focus on strengthening the positive relationships between the health care system and care team and the community, family, and individual. The adapted Care Model serves as a framework to guide the creation of an efficient and accessible system of care that provides safe, timely, effective, equitable, and patient-centered care.
 
Participating organizations will show improvement in preventive care, management of chronic conditions and experience of care, while maintaining financial viability, within an 12-month period. These improvements will be spread across the Indian Health system in an ongoing journey of transformation.

 

Guidance for IPC

Engagement with tribal leadership and the community are essential features of the IPC. The use and transparency of data to guide improvement is central to achievement of this aim. Alignment with organizational priorities and full support of clinical and administrative leadership at all levels within the Indian Health System are critical to the success of IPC.
 
Currently there are 68 Indian Health system sites engaged in the third wave of the Improving Patient Care program (IPC-III). These collaborative teams represent sites in each of the 12 Areas within the Indian Health Service. [Each "Area," a defined geographic region as designated by the Indian Health Service for administrative purposes, administers several Service Units, where health care is provided.] These sites learn and collaborate through regular conference calls, in-person and virtual learning sessions, site visits, and active listserv discussions.
  
In addition, part of any health care improvement process is measuring change.  In order to track progress towards achieving the IPC goals described above, all IPC sites use monthly measurement and reporting to guide improvement in their health care microsystems. Results are shared within the IPC community so that together we will learn what changes hasten clinical prevention, better the care of chronic conditions, lower costs, and improve the patient experience.